Meet The Doctors


Dr. Hansel M Huang, OD, FCOVD

Dr. Huang has been practicing in Windsor, Ontario, since 2006, and treats patients from the surrounding area.

Dr. Huang

He graduated from the NOVA Southeastern University College of Optometry in Florida in 2005, and continues to maintain and improve his educational background in order to provide the best ocular care for patients in Windsor and the surrounding communities.

He is able to diagnose and manage many numerous ocular-related conditions including diabetes, hypertension, cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eyes.

He is also able to help fit patients in numerous different contact lenses, including multifocal contact lenses for those patients that require reading glasses, but want to wear contact lenses, whether for recreation or for cosmetic reasons.

He has also created a Vision Training Clinic and has given more attention to this growing area are he recognizes the need to helps all patients improve their daily visual needs through visual training exercises at their office.

Dr. Huang received his Board Certification as a Fellow of the College of Optometrists in Vision Development in 2018.

He also completed the OEPF Core Curriculum in 2018. He has also incorporated primitive reflex assessment as well as syntonic therapy as part of his visual therapy program.

Dr. Britney Hewitt, OD

Dr. Hewitt graduated from the University of Windsor in 2012 with distinction in biology.

drhewitt

In 2016, she received her Doctor of Optometry degree and was awarded the William Feinbloom Low Vision award. She completed an externship in ocular therapeutics and disease in Baltimore, where she managed ocular diseases such as glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic/hypertensive retinopathy.

During her studies she was a class representative/president for VOSH (Volunteer Optometric Services to Humanity) where she was able to plan and attend mission trips for underprivileged populations around the world. Outside of optometry she loves to travel, run and spend time with friends/family.


New Patients Receive 15% OFF First Visit.

Sign up using the form below or call 519-948-9797 to make an appointment.

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

9:00 am-5:30 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am-5:30 pm

Wednesday:

9:00 am-5:30 pm

Thursday:

9:00 am-5:30 pm

Friday:

9:00 am-4:00 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • "Thank you, Thank you, Thank you, Dr. Dan Cunningham. The new glasses you prescribed for me are amazing and without a doubt the best glasses I have had in years! Your thorough eye exam was so professionally completed and the attention to took to ensure I was satisfied means I can now see better than I have in a long time. I highly recommend Eye Care First and "Dr. Dan" to everyone who values excellent optometry care!!"
    Becky H.

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